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In 2006, one of the hottest years on record, a “pizzly” was discovered near the top of the world. Half polar bear, half grizzly, this never-before-seen animal might be dismissed as a fluke of nature. Anthony Barnosky instead sees it as a harbinger of things to come.In Heatstroke, the renowned paleoecologist shows how global warming is fundamentally changing the natural world and its creatures. While melting ice may have helped produce the pizzly, climate change is more likely to wipe out species than to create them. Plants and animals that have followed the same rhythms for millennia are suddenly being confronted with a world they’re unprepared for—and adaptation usually isn’t an option. This is not the first time climate change has dramatically transformed Earth. Barnosky draws connections between the coming centuries and the end of the last ice age, when mass extinctions swept the planet. The differences now are that climate change is faster and hotter than past changes, and for the first time humanity is driving it. Which means this time we can work to stop it. No one knows exactly what nature will come to look like in this new age of global warming. But Heatstroke gives us a haunting portrait of what we stand to lose and the vitality of what can be saved.

“It is literally neurobiologically impossible to think deeply about things that you don’t care about,” says the neuroscientist Mary Helen Immordino-Yang.

<p>Context: In the aftermath of the Second Lebanon War, a project was initiated and designed to reduce tension in the children living in the area under bombardment. Aims: To assess the impact of yoga intervention in a group of Israeli school children residing in the region affected by the Second Lebanon War. Settings and Design: The study population included 122 school children aged 8–12 years in two elementary schools in Safed (n=55 and n=67, respectively) and their teachers (n=6). The children attended the third grade (n=28), fourth grade (n=42) and sixth grade (n=52)., Inclusion in the study was based on the school principal’s consent to participate in the program. Materials and Methods: Assessment was conducted using three questionnaires that have been previously validated in international studies and translated to Hebrew. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis of the results included Wilcoxon Signed Ranked Tests for pre- and post-intervention comparisons and the Kruskall–Wallis test for teacher and child cross-comparisons. Results: Based on the questionnaires completed by the children and their teachers, we found that the teachers reported many statistically significant improvements in the children’s concentration, mood and ability to function under pressure, although the children themselves were unaware of any change in their behavior. Enjoyment was reported by all participants, and almost all expressed an interest in continuing to practice yoga during school hours. We conclude that participation in yoga classes may be both enjoyable and beneficial to children living in stressful conditions. Conclusions: The study indicates that yoga may be beneficial as an intervention for children in postwar stress situations.</p>
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This book has the potential to profoundly transform your world view. Using high-speed photography, Dr. Masaru Emoto discovered that crystals formed in frozen water reveal changes when specific, concentrated thoughts are directed toward them. He found that water from clear springs and water that has been exposed to loving words shows brilliant, complex, and colorful snowflake patterns. In contrast, polluted water, or water exposed to negative thoughts, forms incomplete, asymmetrical patterns with dull colors. The implications of this research create a new awareness of how we can positively impact the earth and our personal health.

18F-Fallypride and 11C-FLB457 are commonly used PET radioligands for imaging extrastriatal dopamine D2/D3 receptors, but differences in their in vivo kinetics may affect the sensitivity for measuring subtle changes in receptor binding. Focusing on regions of low binding, a direct comparison of the kinetics of 18F-fallypride and 11C-FLB457 was made using a MI protocol. Injection protocols were designed to estimate K1, k2, fNDkon, Bmax, and koff in the midbrain and cortical regions of the rhesus monkey. 11C-FLB457 cleared from the arterial plasma faster and yielded a ND space distribution volume (K1/k2) that is three times higher than 18F-fallypride, primarily due to a slower k2 (FAL:FLB; k2=0.54 min−1:0.18 min−1). The dissociation rate constant, koff, was slower for 11C-FLB457, resulting in a lower KDapp than 18F-fallypride (FAL:FLB; 0.39 nM:0.13 nM). Specific D2/D3 binding could be detected in the cerebellum for 11C-FLB457 but not 18F-fallypride. Both radioligands can be used to image extrastriatal D2/D3 receptors, with 11C-FLB457 providing greater sensitivity to subtle changes in low-receptor-density cortical regions and 18F-fallypride being more sensitive to endogenous dopamine displacement in medium-to-high-receptor-density regions. In the presence of specific D2/D3 binding in the cerebellum, reference region analysis methods will give a greater bias in BPND with 11C-FLB457 than with 18F-fallypride.
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Human activity has been fundamentally disturbing planetary systems of our Earth. To solve the problems that we have created so far needs a different level of consciousness. The potential range of human development includes higher states of consciousness in which human awareness is profoundly connected to the holistic functioning of nature. By functioning in higher states of consciousness, it is possible to not just overcome the challenges of sustainability, but to advance toward flourishing—an optimal quality of life individually and collectively. Ancient Vedic seers were awake to the dynamic laws of nature’s intelligence in their own Transcendental Consciousness. From their cognitions, they brought out practical knowledge concerning life in accord with natural law. Two of the technologies from this Vedic system of knowledge are the Transcendental Meditation® (TM) technique and Maharishi VedicSM Architecture. Extensive research has examined effects of the TM technique on the mind and body, including development to advanced levels of psychological development. Vedic Architecture aims to promote mental clarity, health, and good fortune for inhabitants. The case of 2000 Tower Oaks Boulevard, the largest commercial office building combining Vedic Architecture and green building, illustrates the application of Vedic technologies to harmonize human life with the ordering intelligence of nature.

As universities begin to consider sustainability as a core value in education, there is a need to contemplate the role of transformative learning in higher education. Are current models of university education capable of facilitating action to promote ecological literacy and social change? This article outlines three models of group learning (cooperative, collaborative, and transformative) for use in higher education learning environments. It also examines the possibility (the potential benefits, drawbacks, and implications) of shifting university education from the current model toward a model for transformative learning and sustainability. Ultimately, this article raises a number of questions for academics to consider, including the possible outcomes and implications for implementing transformative education in university curriculum.

Focusing in detail on the process of implementing an SEL program, the author offers guidance for busy school administrators, district supervisors, guidance counselors, and teachers of grades 4-12. He shares the principles that have led him and his colleagues to success--where others have failed--including examples of school initiatives and classroom strategies that work.

Seven studies using experimental and naturalistic methods reveal that upper-class individuals behave more unethically than lower-class individuals. In studies 1 and 2, upper-class individuals were more likely to break the law while driving, relative to lower-class individuals. In follow-up laboratory studies, upper-class individuals were more likely to exhibit unethical decision-making tendencies (study 3), take valued goods from others (study 4), lie in a negotiation (study 5), cheat to increase their chances of winning a prize (study 6), and endorse unethical behavior at work (study 7) than were lower-class individuals. Mediator and moderator data demonstrated that upper-class individuals’ unethical tendencies are accounted for, in part, by their more favorable attitudes toward greed.
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The hindbrain is one of the three major regions of our brains, located at the lower back part of the brain.


Large waves of global interest in meditation over the last half century have all focused on techniques stemming from Hinduism, Buddhism and Daoism. This collection of essays explores selected topics from the historical traditions underlying such practices. The book ventures far beyond the well-known Hindu repetition of sounds, Buddhist attention to breath and body, and Daoist movement of limbs and bodily energies. A picture emerges of meditative traditions that are much richer and more diverse than our modern viewpoint typically acknowledges. Many of the practices are also shown to be of greater cultural relevance than commonly recognized. (Publishers description)



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