Skip to main content Skip to search
Details
Displaying 2901 - 2925 of 7917

Pages

  • Page
  • of 317
The classic text on balance, inner calm, and the cultivation of tranquillity using the age-old techniques of Zen masters• Reveals the psychosomatic underpinnings of Zen, Taoism, and other Eastern traditions• Provides an alternative to the “chest out-belly in” postural attitude of the West• Includes translations of the wisdom teachings of three Japanese masters • Shows how the theory and practice of Hara helps us find our essential selfWhen we speak of an individual’s state, we are actually referring to something that transcends the duality of body and soul, something that reflects the entirety of a person’s being. Because each of us is a unity of body and soul, there is no psychic structure or inner tension that is not reflected outwardly in the form and order of the body. When we find the physical center of the body we also find the psychological center of the soul. According to Zen masters, by correcting posture and breathing to balance this center, one can cultivate inner tranquillity and balance: the state called Hara.In Hara, Karlfried Graf Dürckheim shows the Western world how to overcome the physical and spiritual decay of modern life by adopting the age-old techniques of Japanese Zen masters. By leaving behind the “chest out–belly in” posture and attitude of the West and adopting the belly-centered posture and attitude of Hara, individuals can live a calm, grounded, and more balanced life. Included in this classic text are vital life force practices and translations of the wisdom teachings of three Japanese Zen masters. This book also explores how the practice of Hara emphasizes empirical learning and the cultivation of self-knowledge through the perfection of arts such as painting and archery.

In the American education system, students abilities in subjects like math and social studies are calculated using quantitative metrics. When it comes to their social and emotional skills, these same systems of evaluation may not be transferable. As schools begin to invest resources in social and emotional learning (SEL) and mindfulness programs, it becomes even more important to investigate and understand rigorous methods of evaluation. These methods must be able to offer an accurate picture of a students diverse set of social and emotional skills including competencies in self/social awareness, good decision making, and community engagement, to name a few. Beyond this, schools need to be equipped with valid measures to determine if the programs they implement actually increase these skills in their students. The current study aimed to first examine the psychometric properties of two mindfulness self-report surveys, the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale Adolescents (MASS-A) and the Child and Adolescent Mindfulness Measure (CAMM), as well as one SEL external rater survey titled Devereux Student Strengths Assessment mini (DESSA-mini). Its second goal was to identify a survey that is sensitive to the type of SEL and mindfulness programming the Center for Resilience offers students in an urban charter middle school. Pre- and post-tests were given to students both in the fall before they started the curriculum with the Center for Resilience and in the spring after completing most of the program. The surveys themselves were analyzed for their psychometric properties using coefficient alphas, and a Pearson correlation matrix was calculated among all variables. Paired-sample t-tests were used to assess potential changes in students scores from the first to second testing periods. This study has the potential to contribute to the rapidly growing area of mindfulness in education research. Little has been written on the mindfulness measures in comparison to each other, Genre/Form: text

This book presents a holistic perspective on Green IT by discussing its various facets and showing how to strategically embrace itHarnessing Green IT: Principles and Practices examines various ways of making computing and information systems greener – environmentally sustainable -, as well as several means of using Information Technology (IT) as a tool and an enabler to improve the environmental sustainability. The book focuses on both greening of IT and greening by IT – complimentary approaches to attaining environmental sustainability. In a single volume, it comprehensively covers several key aspects of Green IT - green technologies, design, standards, maturity models, strategies and adoption -, and presents a clear approach to greening IT encompassing green use, green disposal, green design, and green manufacturing. It also illustrates how to strategically apply green IT in practice in several areas. Key Features:

Conventional medical science confirms what Tai Chi masters have known for centuries- regular practice leads to longer life, more vigor and flexibility, better balance and mobility, and a sense of well-being. Cutting-edge research from Harvard Medical School now also supports the long-standing claims that Tai Chi has a beneficial impact on the health of the heart, bones, nerves and muscles, immune system, and the mind. This research also provides insight into the underlying physiological mechanisms that explain how Tai Chi works. Dr. Peter Wayne, a longtime Tai Chi teacher and a researcher at Harvard Medical School, developed the simplified program in this book, similar to protocols that have been scientifically demonstrated to work in a number of clinical trials, and which is suited to people of all ages and can be done in just a few minutes a day. The Harvard Medical School Guide to Tai Chi includes- * The basic program, illustrated by 52 halftones of the author * Practical tips for integrating Tai Chi into everyday activities * A readable introduction to the traditional principles of Tai Chi as viewed through the lens of medical science * How Tai Chi can improve work productivity, enhance creativity, and boost sports performance

Palaeontologists characterize mass extinctions as times when the Earth loses more than three-quarters of its species in a geologically short interval, as has happened only five times in the past 540 million years or so. Biologists now suggest that a sixth mass extinction may be under way, given the known species losses over the past few centuries and millennia. Here we review how differences between fossil and modern data and the addition of recently available palaeontological information influence our understanding of the current extinction crisis. Our results confirm that current extinction rates are higher than would be expected from the fossil record, highlighting the need for effective conservation measures.

Background The aim of this study was to systematically investigate the effectiveness of hatha yoga in treating acute, chronic and/or treatment-resistant mood and anxiety disorders. Methods Medline, Cochrane Library, Current Controlled Trials, Clinical Trials. gov, NHR Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, PsycINFO and CINAHL were searched through June 2018. Randomized controlled trials with patients with mood and anxiety disorders were included. Main outcomes were continuous measures of severity of mood and anxiety symptoms. Cohen's d was calculated as a measure of effect size. Meta-analyses using a random effects model was applied to estimate direct comparisons between yoga and control conditions for depression and anxiety outcomes. Publication bias was visually inspected using funnel plots. Results Eighteen studies were found, fourteen in acute patients and four in chronic patients. Most studies were of low quality. For depression outcomes, hatha yoga did not show a significant effect when compared to treatment as usual, an overall effect size of Cohen's d -0.64 (95% CI = -1.41, 0.13) or to all active control groups, Cohen's d -0.13 (95% CI = -0.49, 0.22). A sub-analysis showed that yoga had a significant effect on the reduction of depression compared to psychoeducation control groups, Cohen's d -0.52 (95% CI = -0.96, -0.08) but not to other active control groups, Cohen's d 0.28 (95% CI = -0.07, 0.63) For studies using a follow-up of six months or more, hatha yoga had no effect on the reduction of depression compared to active control groups, Cohen's d -0.14 (95% CI = -0.60, 0.33). Regarding anxiety, hatha yoga had no significant effect when compared to active control groups, Cohen's d -0.09 (95% CI = -0.47, 0.30). The I-2 and Q-statistic revealed heterogeneity amongst comparisons. Qualitative analyses suggest some promise of hatha yoga for chronic populations. Conclusions The ability to draw firm conclusions is limited by the notable heterogeneity and low quality of most of the included studies. With this caveat in mind, the results of the current meta-analysis suggest that hatha yoga does not have effects on acute, chronic and/or treatment-resistant mood and anxiety disorders compared to treatment as usual or active control groups. However, when compared to psychoeducation, hatha yoga showed more reductions in depression. It is clear that more high-quality studies are needed to advance the field.


The classic manual on Hatha Yoga, this volume contains the original Sanskrit (complete and newly edited), a new, accurate, and accessible English translation, and 15 photos.

This multimethod series of studies merges the literatures on gratitude and risk regulation to test a new process model of gratitude and relationship maintenance. We develop a measure of appreciation in relationships and use cross-sectional, daily experience, observational, and longitudinal methods to test our model. Across studies, we show that people who feel more appreciated by their romantic partners report being more appreciative of their partners. In turn, people who are more appreciative of their partners report being more responsive to their partners' needs (Study 1), and are more committed and more likely to remain in their relationships over time (Study 2). Appreciative partners are also rated by outside observers as relatively more responsive and committed during dyadic interactions in the laboratory, and these behavioral displays are one way in which appreciation is transmitted from one partner to the other (Study 3). These findings provide evidence that gratitude is important for the successful maintenance of intimate bonds.
Zotero Collections:

Savoring, or one's tendency to attend to and enjoy previous, current, and future positive events, is composed of 3 facets: savoring in anticipation. savoring the present moment. and savoring in reminiscence. Whereas research is now accumulating on potential benefits that savoring may have for a variety of individual indicators of well-being. it remains unclear whether savoring may also be relevant to relational well-being. The present investigation seeks to address this gap in the literature by establishing whether savoring is associated with relationship satisfaction. and if so. which facet(s) of savoring are the strongest predictors of relationship satisfaction. Data were collected from 122 undergraduates from a southeastern university currently participating in monogamous dating relationships. Analyses revealed that total savoring as well as each facet of savoring, namely, anticipation, present moment, and reminiscence, were positively related to relationship satisfaction. A subsequent simultaneous multiple regression analysis indicated that anticipation uniquely predicted relationship satisfaction, above and beyond reminiscence and present moment facets of savoring. Overall, it appears that attending to and enjoying positive events is associated with a happier relationship. Furthermore, these data suggest that anticipation may be a component of savoring that is particularly relevant to relationship satisfaction. Results are discussed in the context of optimizing relational well-being.

<p>Lower social class (or socioeconomic status) is associated with fewer resources, greater exposure to threat, and a reduced sense of personal control. Given these life circumstances, one might expect lower class individuals to engage in less prosocial behavior, prioritizing self-interest over the welfare of others. The authors hypothesized, by contrast, that lower class individuals orient to the welfare of others as a means to adapt to their more hostile environments and that this orientation gives rise to greater prosocial behavior. Across 4 studies, lower class individuals proved to be more generous (Study 1), charitable (Study 2), trusting (Study 3), and helpful (Study 4) compared with their upper class counterparts. Mediator and moderator data showed that lower class individuals acted in a more prosocial fashion because of a greater commitment to egalitarian values and feelings of compassion. Implications for social class, prosocial behavior, and economic inequality are discussed.</p>
Zotero Collections:

Mindfulness as focused attention and awareness with acceptance is increasingly being promoted and used as a professional development tool for educators to improve their own as well as students’ well-being, stress, and learning climate. Twenty-six K-12 Hawaii teachers and counselors participated in a three-day mindfulness training course as part of a professional development opportunity. Phenomenological, content analyses of educators’ reflections on personal practices revealed feelings of stress associated with classroom/student management and lack of self-care. Reflections also revealed mindfulness practices helping them to become more aware of their unskillful emotional and mental habit patterns, and how to manage stress. Their reflections on implementing three simple mindfulness lesson plans with students revealed favorable perceptions of mindfulness to improve the lives of their students, the ease as well as challenges of incorporating the practices into the classroom, and the enthusiastic adoption and uptake by the students. Research and policy recommendations as well as implications are discussed, particularly as it relates to current challenges and criticisms of secular mindfulness in education.

Introduction to the Hawn Foundation's The MindUp Program.

Laura Dern is Amy Jellicoe, a health and beauty executive who returns from a post-meltdown retreat to pick up the pieces of her broken life in the HBO series Enlightened. Series creator Mike White talks about the tone of the show, and whether it's possible for people to really change.

An ancient Daoist saying tells us "When you are sick, do not seek a cure. Find your centre and you will be healed." The centre it refers to is located deep in the sensed interiority of our belly, that abode of the soul known in Japanese as hara. 'Depression' (a word with no equivalent in Japanese) is, in essence, a lack of hara. With hara awareness we not only recontact our own innermost soul depths and soul centre. We learn to make contact with others from that centre - to experience true intimacy of soul. Hara awareness is both an alternative to medical and psychiatric 'cures' and the basis for a genuinely psychological medicine - an anatomy of the soul-body. Head, Heart and Hara contrasts the head- and heart-centred culture of the West with the hara culture of Japan. It also shows how hara awareness can unite the primordial wisdom of both East and West. Peter Wilberg brings together the dao of Lao Tse and the logos of Heraclitus in a new spiritual anatomy of the soul and its body.

Pages

  • Page
  • of 317