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<p>This book presents Tibetan Buddhist instructions for transforming negative thoughts and feelings into loving-kindness toward all beings. Tulku Thondup instructs that by bringing to mind images and thoughts of Avalokiteshvara, the Buddhist deity of loving-kindness, we can connect from the heart with the Buddha's example. According to Tulku Thondup, when we awaken loving-kindness through this practice, our outlook on life fundamentally changes and we ourselves can become a source of joy and inspiration to others.</p>

More than twenty years ago, Jon Kabat-Zinn showed us the value of cultivating greater awareness in everyday life with his now-classic introduction to mindfulness, Wherever You Go, There You Are. Now, in The Healing Power of Mindfulness, he shares a cornucopia of specific examples as to how the cultivation of mindfulness can reshape your relationship with your own body and mind--explaining what we're learning about neuroplasticity and the brain, how meditation can affect our biology and our health, and what mindfulness can teach us about coming to terms with all sorts of life challenges, including our own mortality, so we can make the most of the moments that we have. Originally published in 2005 as part of a larger book titled Coming to Our Senses, The Healing Power of Mindfulness features a new foreword by the author and timely updates throughout the text. If you are interested in learning more about how mindfulness as a way of being can help us to heal, physically and emotionally, look no further than this deeply personal and also "deeply optimistic book, grounded in good science and filled with practical recommendations for moving in the right direction" (Andrew Weil, MD), from one of the pioneers of the worldwide mindfulness movement

Clean energy can provide different health and environmental benefits depending on location. Modelling shows that renewable energy and energy-saving projects could deliver annual benefits of up to US$210 million across six locations in the USA.

Reviews the literature on loneliness-prevention interventions that have their common foundation in empirical research. Two loneliness-fostering conditions are identified: absence of an attachment figure and a sense of not belonging. Findings indicate that feelings of loneliness are an alarm signal that the individual's social relations are seriously deficient. Loneliness can be detrimental to one's mental health, can be a precursor for depression, may jeopardize a person's psychological sense of well-being, and may increase the risk of suicide. Causes of loneliness are presented. Self-reports of loneliness are most common among adolescents and the elderly. Intervention methods are described, including implications and interventions for college students, and the limitations of the effectiveness of intervention approaches are mentioned. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)

This ground-breaking study offers new challenges to those teaching, studying or developing strategies and policies in health and the environment.Bringing together a variety of approaches from different perspectives and different locations, the contributors examine the various dimensions of health ecology in a human ecology framework, examining how local, regional and global factors impinge upon the health and environment of individuals, communities and the globe.

Thousands of years ago yoga originated in India, and in present day and age, an alarming awareness was observed in health and natural remedies among people by yoga and pranayama which has been proven an effective method for improving health in addition to prevention and management of diseases. With increasing scientific research in yoga, its therapeutic aspects are also being explored. Yoga is reported to reduce stress and anxiety, improves autonomic functions by triggering neurohormonal mechanisms by the suppression of sympathetic activity, and even, now-a-days, several reports suggested yoga is beneficial for physical health of cancer patients. Such global recognition of yoga also testifies to India's growing cultural influence.

Although there is growing interest among health and social care professionals in the social and therapeutic value of horticulture, there is little evidence that demonstrates the range of outcomes for vulnerable groups, including those with learning difficulties and mental health problems. This report addresses this gap in knowledge and presents the findings of the Growing Together project, the first detailed study of horticulture and gardening projects across the UK. The report is aimed at policy makers, professionals, researchers and students in the fields of health and social care and occupational and horticultural therapy who are hungry for hard evidence in this new field, as well as anyone interested in addressing the needs of vulnerable and socially excluded adults. The Growing Together project is a partnership between Loughborough University and Thrive and has been funded by the Big Lottery Fund. This report complements a practice guide, Growing together: A practice guide to promoting social inclusion through gardening and horticulture, which is also available from The Policy Press.

The hectic pace of contemporary life is a major source of acute and chronic stress, which may have a deleterious impact on body health . In the field of cardiovascular disease, acute emotional stress has been associated with coronary spasm and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, whereas the manifestations of chronic stress have been overlooked, and most underlying pathophysiology remains to be elucidated. Chronic stress affects the neuronal circuitry composed of cortico-limbic structures and the nuclei regulating autonomic function, eliciting a sympatho-vagal imbalance, characterised by adrenergic activation and vagal withdrawal. Sympathetic terminals are connected to cardiomyocytes in a quasi-synaptic way, producing the so called 'neuro-cardiac junction'. During chronic stress, norepinephrine release is increased, leading to overstimulation of cardiomyocytes via beta1-adrenergic receptors, influencing mainly calcium dynamics, and beta2-adrenergic receptors, which control housekeeping functions. The circadian rhythm of cardiomyocytes is then impaired, with elongation of the catabolic ('light' phase) over the anabolic ('nocturnal') phase. This leads to a depletion of cell energy storage, and a decreased turnover of cell constituents. Even cell interactions are affected, as coupling between cardiomyocytes decreases while coupling between cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts increases. The ultimate results are changes in the shape and velocity of action potential, fibroblast activation and deposition of extracellular matrix. These alterations may predispose to arrhythmias and may favour the development of a stress-related cardiomyopathy. A better comprehension of this cascade of events may allow us to identify screening protocols and treatment strategies (meditation, yoga, physical activity, psychological assistance, beta-blockers) to prevent or relieve ongoing cardiac damage.

Whilst urban-dwelling individuals who seek out parks and gardens appear to intuitively understand the personal health and well-being benefits arising from ‘contact with nature’, public health strategies are yet to maximize the untapped resource nature provides, including the benefits of nature contact as an upstream health promotion interven- tion for populations. This paper presents a summary of empirical, theoretical and anecdotal evidence drawn from a literature review of the human health benefits of contact with nature. Initial findings indicate that nature plays a vital role in human health and well-being, and that parks and nature reserves play a significant role by providing access to nature for individuals. Implications suggest contact with nature may provide an effective population-wide strategy in prevention of mental ill health, with potential application for sub-populations, communit- ies and individuals at higher risk of ill health. Recommenda- tions include further investigation of ‘contact with nature’ in population health, and examination of the benefits of nature-based interventions. To maximize use of ‘contact with nature’ in the health promotion of populations, collab- orative strategies between researchers and primary health, social services, urban planning and environmental manage- ment sectors are required. This approach offers not only an augmentation of existing health promotion and prevention activities, but provides the basis for a socio-ecological approach to public health that incorporates environmental sustainability.

The present study examines the relationships between mindfulness and rumination, repetitive negative thinking, and depressive symptoms, employing a newly developed paradigm for the assessment of mindfulness. Derived from a central exercise of mindfulness-based interventions, 42 undergraduates were asked to observe their breath for about 18 min. Within this time period, they were prompted 22 times at irregular intervals to indicate whether they had lost mindful contact with their breath as a result of mind wandering. The results show negative correlations between the degree of the ability to stay mindfully in contact with the breath and measures of rumination, repetitive negative thinking, and depression. Moreover, positive associations with self-report data of mindfulness and a negative relationship to fear of bodily sensations support the construct validity of our new approach for the assessment of mindfulness. In summary, findings suggest the healthy quality of mindful breathing regarding depression-related processes.

The present study examines the relationships between mindfulness and rumination, repetitive negative thinking, and depressive symptoms, employing a newly developed paradigm for the assessment of mindfulness. Derived from a central exercise of mindfulness-based interventions, 42 undergraduates were asked to observe their breath for about 18 min. Within this time period, they were prompted 22 times at irregular intervals to indicate whether they had lost mindful contact with their breath as a result of mind wandering. The results show negative correlations between the degree of the ability to stay mindfully in contact with the breath and measures of rumination, repetitive negative thinking, and depression. Moreover, positive associations with self-report data of mindfulness and a negative relationship to fear of bodily sensations support the construct validity of our new approach for the assessment of mindfulness. In summary, findings suggest the healthy quality of mindful breathing regarding depression-related processes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)

"This is the text that preservice teachers will take into practice and practicing teachers will turn to again and again to improve classroom culture and learning, with clear guidelines for essential SEL and academic linkages, a wealth of selective extensive teaching resources in multiple media and feedback from real teachers who have adopted this work in their classrooms"--

Neuroscientist Richard Davidson presents his research on how social and emotional learning can affect the brain. Read more about the topic, including how to use social and emotional learning to stop bullying, on our Edutopia website: http://www.edutopia.org/social-emotio...

"A call to advance integrative teaching and learning in higher education. From Parker Palmer, best-selling author of The Courage to Teach, and Arthur Zajonc, professor of physics at Amherst College and director of the academic program of the Center for Contemplative Mind in Society, comes this call to revisit the roots and reclaim the vision of higher education. The Heart of Higher Education proposes an approach to teaching and learning that honors the whole human being--mind, heart, and spirit--an essential integration if we hope to address the complex issues of our time. The book offers a rich interplay of analysis, theory, and proposals for action from two educators and writers who have contributed to developing the field of integrative education over the past few decades. Presents Parker Palmer's powerful response to critics of holistic learning and Arthur Zajonc's elucidation of the relationship between science, the humanities, and the contemplative traditions. Explores ways to take steps toward making colleges and universities places that awaken the deepest potential in students, faculty, and staff. Offers a practical approach to fostering renewal in higher education through collegiality and conversation. The Heart of Higher Education is for all who are new to the field of holistic education, all who want to deepen their understanding of its challenges, and all who want to practice and promote this vital approach to teaching and learning on their campuses"--Provided by publisher.

A call to advance integrative teaching and learning in higher education. From Parker Palmer, best-selling author of The Courage to Teach, and Arthur Zajonc, professor of physics at Amherst College and director of the academic program of the Center for Contemplative Mind in Society, comes this call to revisit the roots and reclaim the vision of higher education. The Heart of Higher Education proposes an approach to teaching and learning that honors the whole human being--mind, heart, and spirit--an essential integration if we hope to address the complex issues of our time. The book offers a rich interplay of analysis, theory, and proposals for action from two educators and writers who have contributed to developing the field of integrative education over the past few decades. Presents Parker Palmer's powerful response to critics of holistic learning and Arthur Zajonc's elucidation of the relationship between science, the humanities, and the contemplative traditions. Explores ways to take steps toward making colleges and universities places that awaken the deepest potential in students, faculty, and staff. Offers a practical approach to fostering renewal in higher education through collegiality and conversation. The Heart of Higher Education is for all who are new to the field of holistic education, all who want to deepen their understanding of its challenges, and all who want to practice and promote this vital approach to teaching and learning on their campuses

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