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<p>'Wisdom Energy' is a simple and compelling introduction to Buddhism by two Tibetan lamas renowned for their insight and skill in teaching Westerners. Containing an entire meditation course, it goes to the heart of basic Buddhist practice adn discusses the meaning and purpose of meditation, the causes of dissatisfaction and unhappiness, and the methods for subduing them and gaining control over our minds and lives. 'Wisdom Energy' preserves the power, humor, and directness of the lamas' first teaching tour of North America in the 1970s, giving the reader the feeling of an intimate audience with two of Buddhism's greatest teachers.</p>
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<p>The very first entry in the tantra section of the Buddhist canon translated into Tibetan, right before the Kalacakra root tantra, is the Jampal Tsenjod ('jam dpal mtshan yang dag par brjod pa) - Professing The Qualities of Manjusri. The Indian Buddhist masters who first brought their tantric tradition to Tibet treated this text as fundamental to the view and practice of both Maha Yoga and Ati Yoga (or Dzogchen), the non-dual dharma. Presented here, alongside a new translation of the root tantra that seeks to convey its peotic brilliance as a classical masterpiece of world literature, are three original commentaries - two by Indian masters, Vimalamitra adn Garab Dorje, and one by the renowned 11th century Tibentan master Rongzom Majapandita. Together they provide a complete view of the importance of this text within the Nyingma tradition, and for the Vajrayana Buddhist teachings in general.</p>
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<p>Yantra Yoga, the Buddhist parallel to the Hathayoga of the Hindu tradition, is a system of practice entailing bodily movements, breathing exercises and visualizations. Originally transmitted by the mahasiddhas of India and Oddiyana, its practice is nowadays found in all schools of Tibetan Buddhism in relation to the Anuttaratantras, more generally known under the Tibentan term 'trulkhor', whose Sanskrit equivalent is 'yantra'. The Union of the Sun and Moon Yantra ('Phrul 'khor nyi zla kha sbyor), orally transmitted in Tibet in the eighth century by the great master Padmasambhava to the Tibetan translator and Dzogchen master Vairochana, can be considered the most ancient of all the systems of Yantra and its peculiarity is that it contains also numerous positions which are also found in the classic Yoga tradition. Chögyal Namkhai Norbu, one of the great living masters of Dzogchen and Tantra, started transmitting this profound Yoga in the seventies, and at that time wrote this commentary which is based on the oral explanations of some Tibetan yogins and siddhas of the twentieth century. All Western practitioners will benefits from the extraordinary instructions contained in this volume.</p>
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<p>In this book Zen Buddhism becomes the opening wedge for an extraordinarily wide-ranging exploration of consciousness. In order to understand which brain mechanisms produce Zen states, one needs some understanding of the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the brain. Austin, both a neurologist and a Zen practitioner, interweaves the most recent brain research with the personal narrative of his Zen experiences. The science is both inclusive and rigorous; the Zen sections are clear and evocative. Along the way, Austin examines such topics as similar states in other disciplines and religions, sleep and dreams, mental illness, consciousness-altering drugs, and the social consequences of the advanced stage of ongoing enlightenment.</p>
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<p>"This sequel to the widely read Zen and the Brain continues James Austin's explorations into the key interrelationships between Zen Buddhism and brain research. In Zen-Brain Reflections, Austin, a clinical neurologist, researcher, and Zen practitioner, examines the evolving psychological processes and brain changes associated with the path of long-range meditative training. Austin draws not only on the latest neuroscience research and new neuroimaging studies but also on Zen literature and his personal experience with alternate states of consciousness. Zen-Brain Reflections takes up where the earlier book left off. It addresses such questions as: how do placebos and acupuncture change the brain? Can neuroimaging studies localize the sites where our notions of self arise? How can the latest brain imaging methods monitor meditators more effectively? How do long years of meditative training plus brief enlightened states produce pivotal transformations in the physiology of the brain? In many chapters testable hypotheses suggest ways to correlate normal brain functions and meditative training with the phenomena of extraordinary states of consciousness."--Jacket.</p>
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