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There are a great many books now available describing the complex rituals and esoteric significance of the ancient practices of Buddhist tantra. But none take the friendly, helpful approach of Geshe Tashi Tsering’s Foundation of Buddhist Thought series. Understanding the many questions Westerners have upon first encountering tantra’s colorful imagery and veiled language, Geshe Tsering gives straight talk about deities, initiations, mandalas, and the various stages of tantric development. He even goes through a simple tantric compassion practice written by the Dalai Lama, using it to unpack the building blocks common to all such visualization techniques. Tantra is a fitting conclusion to the folksy and practical wisdom in the Foundation of Buddhist Thought series.

Reflective practice has been widely adopted as a successful method for developing nursing. The second edition of Transforming Nursing through Reflective Practice provides a wealth of new insights from practitioners actively involved in reflective practice in nursing research, education, clinical practice and practice development.This invaluable book enables nurses to continually evaluate their own practice in order to inform their approaches to reflection; critique, develop and monitor their professional practice; and thereby improve the quality of their patient care. There is a greater emphasis in the new edition on transforming practice, the research base for reflective practice and grounding the reflective process in clinical practice.* Examines the contribution of reflective practice to nursing* Enables nurses to continually develop their practice and improve patient care* Includes insights from many areas of clinical practice* Explores the role of reflection in clinical supervision and research studies* Examines the role of narrative and reflective dialogue in reflective practice

It has been widely assumed that emotional avoidance during bereavement leads to either prolonged grief, delayed grief, or delayed somatic symptoms. To test this view, as well as a contrasting adaptive hypothesis, emotional avoidance was measured 6 months after a conjugal loss as negative verbal-autonomic response dissociation (low self-rated negative emotion coupled with heightened cardiovascular activity) and compared with grief measured at 6 and 14 months. The negative dissociation score evidenced reliability and validity but did not evidence the assumed link to severe grief. Rather, consistent with the adaptive hypothesis, negative dissociation at 6 months was associated with minimal grief symptoms across 14 months. Negative dissociation scores were also linked to initially high levels of somatic symptoms, which dropped to a low level by 14 months. Possible explanations for the initial cost and long-term adaptive quality of emotional avoidance during bereavement, as well as implications and limitations of the findings, are discussed.
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