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Academic stress is the most common emotional or mental state that students experience during their studies. Stress is a result of a wide range of issues, including test and exam burden, a demanding course, a different educational system, and thinking about future plans upon graduation. A sizeable body of literature in stress management research has found that self-regulation and being mindful will help students to cope up with the stress and dodge long-term negative consequences, such as substance abuse. The present study aims to investigate the influence of academic stress, self-regulation, and mindfulness among undergraduate students in Klang Valley, Malaysia, and to identify mindfulness as the mediator between academic stress and self-regulation. For this study, a total of 384 undergraduate students in Klang Valley, Malaysia were recruited. Using Correlational analysis, results revealed that there was a significant relationship between academic stress, self-regulation, and mindfulness. However, using SPSS mediational analysis, mindfulness did not prove the mediator role in the study.

This book utilizes quantitative research methods to identify the relationship between the level of mindfulness and demographic factors among university students in Malaysia. More specifically, it explores the mindfulness, its benefits and relationship with demography, and the field of study of university students. While Mindfulness Attention Awareness Scale questionnaire (Brown & Rayan, 2003) was used for the quantitative approach, findings in the book were also ascertained through descriptive and co-relational statistics test. The research presented in the book moves beyond the individual level of mindfulness towards "organizational mindfulness", and will be useful for psychotherapists, high school counselors and teachers.