Skip to main content Skip to search
Details
Displaying 1 - 25 of 190

Pages

  • Page
  • of 8
00:52:38 - Topics Discussed: Nature, Sustainability, Organic farming, Environmental issues, City vs Nature, Science & NatureJan Kuśmirek is a medical he...

How is Adaptation Practice different from Mindfulness and CBT? Over recent years a lot of people have asked me about Mindfulness, Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). What do I think of them? Is


The last officially recognized epoch on Earth, the Holocene, began at the end of the last ice age, about 12,000 years ago. Now, climate change, and in particular humanity’s impact on climate change, has led to the suggestion that we are already in a new epoch, the Anthropocene.David’s most recent book, Earth in Human Hands, was named Best Science Book of 2016 by NPR’s Science Friday, explores how we can take on the possibly existential threat to life on Earth and consciously shape our planet’s future. David’s research focuses on climate evolution on Earth-like planets and potential conditions for life elsewhere. He is involved with several interplanetary spacecraft missions. In 2013 he was appointed as the inaugural Chair of Astrobiology at the U.S. Library of Congress where he studied the human impact on Earth systems and organized a public symposium on the Longevity of Human Civilization. His papers have been published in Nature, Science, and numerous other journals, and his popular writing has appeared in many newspapers and magazines. David has been the recipient of the Carl Sagan Medal for Public Communication of Planetary Science by the American Astronomical Society. He appears frequently as a science commentator on television, radio and podcasts, included as a regular host of StarTalk All Stars. He is also a musician and currently leads House Band of the Universe.

This podcast is a talk given by Eline Snel who is a dutch therapist whose mindfulness-based methods are implemented in schools in Europe. She discusses the importance of applying mindfulness not as a way to fix schools, but to help children to learn more about themselves, particularly their thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. However, she advocates that adults must have their own practice in order to teach it to children.

Beth Berila explores how contemplative learning, including mindfulness, can be used to incorporate anti-oppressive learning into the field of higher education. Berila illustrates how mindfulness can be used to interrupt and reframe harmful narratives about the perception of others in society at large.

“The blue pearl” is how one of my students described the experience of developing mindfulness. She said that the ability “to draw inwards and be peaceful shows as a concentrated blue light in my brain.” In this webinar I describe the results of my research with undergraduate students on the efficacy of and their experiences with contemplative pedagogy. I teach first-year students both techniques of meditation and contemplative approaches to making art. My presentation will focus on conceptual issues raised by my formal human-subject research with students over three years, research that included qualitative feedback from them through narrative exercises and journals, a series of quantitative questionnaires about their experiences, and their own works of art.”

A major new report from the Aspen Institute — drawing on research from Professor Stephanie Jones — adds fuel to a growing movement to integrate social, emotional, and academic learning and teach the whole child.

In this webinar, Carolyn Jacobs and Mirabai Bush engage in a dialogue about their experiences teaching students in Smith College’s Contemplative Clinical Practice Advanced Certificate Program. Carolyn and Mirabai discuss common challenges that arise during the integration of contemplative practices into college courses, including: handling difficult emotions or thoughts that students experience during practices, choosing and designing practices which complement the course material, and creating a safe and welcoming space for students from a variety of religious and cultural backgrounds. They also explore some of the cognitive, social, and emotional benefits of using contemplative methods in the classroom. Webinar participants will had the opportunity to submit questions to the presenters.

Demonstrates an understanding of the need to teach students social-emotional skills and an understanding of the five dimensions of SEL and how they relate to instruction.

Pages

  • Page
  • of 8