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Recent research has established the effect of mindfulness on subjective well-being. In this present study we attempt to extend the previous literature by investigating the potential mediating role of resilience in the impact of mindfulness on life satisfaction and affect as indices of subjective well-being. The Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS), Connor–Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC), the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) and Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) were administered to 327 undergraduate university students in India. Structural equation modeling (SEM) results showed that resilience partially mediated the relationship between mindfulness and life satisfaction and affect components. The findings corroborate an important role of resilience in mindfulness exerting its beneficial effects. This study makes a contribution to the potential mechanism of the association between mindfulness and subjective well-being.

The current study aimed to examine the mediation effects of self-esteem on the association between mindfulness and anxiety and depression. A sample of 417 undergraduate students completed a packet of questionnaires that assessed mindfulness, self-esteem, anxiety, and depression. Correlation results indicated that mindfulness was associated with self-esteem, anxiety, and depression. Using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM), mediational analyses showed that mindfulness exerted its indirect effect on anxiety and depression through self-esteem. A multi-group analysis showed that the mediational model was not moderated by gender and thus provided a preliminary support for the robustness of the final meditational model. The findings corroborate an important role of self-esteem in mindfulness exerting its beneficial effects on anxiety and depression.

The relationship between mindfulness and well-being has received considerable importance in positive psychological research. The aim of the present study was to examine whether self-esteem mediates the relationship between mindfulness and well-being. A sample of 318 Indian undergraduate university students in the age range of 18–23years completed self-report measures of mindfulness, self-esteem, affect and mental well-being. Correlation results indicated that mindfulness was associated with self-esteem, affect, and mental well-being and self-esteem was associated with affect and mental well-being. Analysis using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) showed that self-esteem fully mediated the relationship between mindfulness and positive affect and mental well-being. Furthermore, self esteem partially mediated the relationship between mindfulness and negative affect. Moreover, a multi-group analysis showed that the mediational model was not moderated by gender. The limitations and implications of the results are discussed.