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Context • Several studies have revealed a high rate of physical and psychological problems from stress among schoolteachers. Yoga is one of the mind-body interventions known to alleviate stress and effects. The mind sound resonance technique (MSRT), a yoga-based, mindfulness relaxation is recognized as having a positive influence on physical and psychological health. Objectives • The study intended to examine the effects of an MSRT intervention for 1 mo on perceived stress, quality of sleep, cognitive function, state and trait anxiety, psychological distress, and fatigue among female teachers. Design • The study was a randomized, controlled trial. Setting • The study occurred at 2 primary schools in Bangalore City, India. Participants • Sixty female teachers, aged between 30 and 55 y, from the 2 schools were enrolled in the study. Intervention • The participants were randomly divided into an MSRT group (n = 30) and a control group (n = 30). Participants in the MSRT group participated in MSRT for 30 min/d, 5 d/wk, for the duration of 1 mo. The participants in the control group followed their normal daily routines. Outcome measures • Perceived stress, sleep quality, cognitive function, anxiety, psychological distress, fatigue, and self-esteem were assessed using standardized assessment tools at baseline and after 1 mo of the intervention. Results • In the MSRT group, a significant reduction occurred for 5 variables: (1) 47.01% for perceived stress (P < .001), (2) 28.76% for state anxiety (P < .001), (3) 13.35% for trait anxiety (P < .001), (4) 32.90% for psychological distress (P < .001), and (5) 44.79% for fatigue (P < .001). A significant improvement occurred for that group for 2 variables: (1) 44.94% for quality of sleep (P < .001), and (2) 12.12% for self-esteem (P < .001). An 11.88% increase occurred for the group for cognitive function, but the change was not significant (P = .111). On the other hand, the control group showed significant increases in 5 variables: (1) 55.56% for perceived stress (P < .001), (2) 13.32% for state anxiety (P < .001), (3) 21.28% for trait anxiety (P < .001), (4) 20.95% for psychological distress (P = .103), and (5) 16.44% for fatigue (P < .001). The group also showed significant decreases in 3 variables: (1) 3.51% for self-esteem (P < .001), (2) 21.39% for quality of sleep (P = .003), and (3) 17.60% for cognitive function (P = .002). A comparison between the 2 groups showed significant differences in 7 variables: (1) perceived stress (P < .001), (2) quality of sleep (P < .001), (3) state anxiety (P < .001), (4) trait anxiety (P < .001), (5) psychological distress (P = .006), (6) fatigue (P = .005), and (7) self-esteem (P < .001). No significant differences existed between the groups in cognitive function (P = .083). Conclusions • In the current study, the practice of MSRT facilitated a reduction in the levels of stress, anxiety, fatigue, and psychological distress. The relaxation technique also enhanced the levels of self-esteem and quality of sleep among female teachers working in primary schools.

Context • Several studies have revealed a high rate of physical and psychological problems from stress among schoolteachers. Yoga is one of the mind-body interventions known to alleviate stress and effects. The mind sound resonance technique (MSRT), a yoga-based, mindfulness relaxation is recognized as having a positive influence on physical and psychological health. Objectives • The study intended to examine the effects of an MSRT intervention for 1 mo on perceived stress, quality of sleep, cognitive function, state and trait anxiety, psychological distress, and fatigue among female teachers. Design • The study was a randomized, controlled trial. Setting • The study occurred at 2 primary schools in Bangalore City, India. Participants • Sixty female teachers, aged between 30 and 55 y, from the 2 schools were enrolled in the study. Intervention • The participants were randomly divided into an MSRT group (n = 30) and a control group (n = 30). Participants in the MSRT group participated in MSRT for 30 min/d, 5 d/wk, for the duration of 1 mo. The participants in the control group followed their normal daily routines. Outcome measures • Perceived stress, sleep quality, cognitive function, anxiety, psychological distress, fatigue, and self-esteem were assessed using standardized assessment tools at baseline and after 1 mo of the intervention. Results • In the MSRT group, a significant reduction occurred for 5 variables: (1) 47.01% for perceived stress (P < .001), (2) 28.76% for state anxiety (P < .001), (3) 13.35% for trait anxiety (P < .001), (4) 32.90% for psychological distress (P < .001), and (5) 44.79% for fatigue (P < .001). A significant improvement occurred for that group for 2 variables: (1) 44.94% for quality of sleep (P < .001), and (2) 12.12% for self-esteem (P < .001). An 11.88% increase occurred for the group for cognitive function, but the change was not significant (P = .111). On the other hand, the control group showed significant increases in 5 variables: (1) 55.56% for perceived stress (P < .001), (2) 13.32% for state anxiety (P < .001), (3) 21.28% for trait anxiety (P < .001), (4) 20.95% for psychological distress (P = .103), and (5) 16.44% for fatigue (P < .001). The group also showed significant decreases in 3 variables: (1) 3.51% for self-esteem (P < .001), (2) 21.39% for quality of sleep (P = .003), and (3) 17.60% for cognitive function (P = .002). A comparison between the 2 groups showed significant differences in 7 variables: (1) perceived stress (P < .001), (2) quality of sleep (P < .001), (3) state anxiety (P < .001), (4) trait anxiety (P < .001), (5) psychological distress (P = .006), (6) fatigue (P = .005), and (7) self-esteem (P < .001). No significant differences existed between the groups in cognitive function (P = .083). Conclusions • In the current study, the practice of MSRT facilitated a reduction in the levels of stress, anxiety, fatigue, and psychological distress. The relaxation technique also enhanced the levels of self-esteem and quality of sleep among female teachers working in primary schools.

AIMS: The aim of this study is to compare the effects of yoga program with supportive therapy counseling on mood states, treatment-related symptoms, toxicity, and quality of life in Stage II and III breast cancer patients on conventional treatment.METHODS: Ninety-eight Stage II and III breast cancer patients underwent surgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) or chemotherapy (CT) or both at a cancer center were randomly assigned to receive yoga (n = 45) and supportive therapy counseling (n = 53) over a 24-week period. Intervention consisted of 60-min yoga sessions, daily while the control group was imparted supportive therapy during their hospital visits. Assessments included state-trait anxiety inventory, Beck's depression inventory, symptom checklist, common toxicity criteria, and functional living index-cancer. Assessments were done at baseline, after surgery, before, during, and after RT and six cycles of CT. RESULTS: Both groups had similar baseline scores. There were 29 dropouts 12 (yoga) and 17 (controls) following surgery. Sixty-nine participants contributed data to the current analysis (33 in yoga, and 36 in controls). An ANCOVA, adjusting for baseline differences, showed a significant decrease for the yoga intervention as compared to the control group during RT (first result) and CT (second result), in (i) anxiety state by 4.72 and 7.7 points, (ii) depression by 5.74 and 7.25 points, (iii) treatment-related symptoms by 2.34 and 2.97 points, (iv) severity of symptoms by 6.43 and 8.83 points, (v) distress by 7.19 and 13.11 points, and (vi) and improved overall quality of life by 23.9 and 31.2 points as compared to controls. Toxicity was significantly less in the yoga group (P = 0.01) during CT. CONCLUSION: The results suggest a possible use for yoga as a psychotherapeutic intervention in breast cancer patients undergoing conventional treatment.