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AIM: Breast cancer has become a pandemic with an ever-increasing incidence. Although better diagnostics and treatment modalities have reduced mortality, a large number of survivors face cancer and treatment-related long-term symptoms. Many survivors are taking up yoga for improving the quality of life (QoL). The present study attempts to evaluate predictors of psychological states in breast cancer survivors with long-term yoga experience. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A case-control study recruited early breast cancer survivors, 30-65 years, completing treatment > 6 months before recruitment, and grouped them based on prior yoga experience (BCY, n = 27) or naive (BCN, n = 25). Demography, cancer history, diet, exercise habits, and yoga schedule were collected and tools to assess stress, anxiety, depression, general health, and QoL were administered. Multivariate linear regression was done to identify predictors of psychological variables. RESULTS: BCY had significantly lower stress, anxiety, depression, better general health, and QoL (P < 0.001). Global QoL and trait anxiety were significantly predicted by Yoga practice; depression was predicted by yoga practice, annual income, and sleep quality; state anxiety was predicted by Yoga practice and income; and stress was predicted by Yoga practice and sleep quality. CONCLUSION: Results indicate that breast cancer survivors, doing yoga, have better psychological profiles and are able to deal with demanding situations better. The psycho-oncogenic model of cancer etiology suggests that a better psychological state in survival has the potential to improve prognosis and survival outcomes and Yoga may be a suitable practice for staying cancer-free for a longer time.

Effects of an integrated yoga program in modulating perceived stress levels, anxiety, as well as depression levels and radiation-induced DNA damage were studied in 68 breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Two psychological questionnaires--Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS)--and DNA damage assay were used in the study. There was a significant decrease in the HADS scores in the yoga intervention group, whereas the control group displayed an increase in these scores. Mean PSS was decreased in the yoga group, whereas the control group did not show any change pre- and postradiotherapy. Radiation-induced DNA damage was significantly elevated in both the yoga and control groups after radiotherapy, but the postradiotherapy DNA damage in the yoga group was slightly less when compared to the control group. An integrated approach of yoga intervention modulates the stress and DNA damage levels in breast cancer patients during radiotherapy.

Effects of an integrated yoga program in modulating perceived stress levels, anxiety, as well as depression levels and radiation-induced DNA damage were studied in 68 breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Two psychological questionnaires--Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS)--and DNA damage assay were used in the study. There was a significant decrease in the HADS scores in the yoga intervention group, whereas the control group displayed an increase in these scores. Mean PSS was decreased in the yoga group, whereas the control group did not show any change pre- and postradiotherapy. Radiation-induced DNA damage was significantly elevated in both the yoga and control groups after radiotherapy, but the postradiotherapy DNA damage in the yoga group was slightly less when compared to the control group. An integrated approach of yoga intervention modulates the stress and DNA damage levels in breast cancer patients during radiotherapy.

Effects of an integrated yoga program in modulating perceived stress levels, anxiety, as well as depression levels and radiation-induced DNA damage were studied in 68 breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Two psychological questionnaires--Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS)--and DNA damage assay were used in the study. There was a significant decrease in the HADS scores in the yoga intervention group, whereas the control group displayed an increase in these scores. Mean PSS was decreased in the yoga group, whereas the control group did not show any change pre- and postradiotherapy. Radiation-induced DNA damage was significantly elevated in both the yoga and control groups after radiotherapy, but the postradiotherapy DNA damage in the yoga group was slightly less when compared to the control group. An integrated approach of yoga intervention modulates the stress and DNA damage levels in breast cancer patients during radiotherapy.

INTRODUCTION: Palliative care is usually delivered late in the course of illness trajectory. This precludes patients on active disease modifying treatment from receiving the benefit of palliative care intervention. A survey was conducted to know the opinion of oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients about the role of early specialist palliative care in cancer. METHODS: A nonrandomized descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at a tertiary cancer care center in India. Thirty oncologists, sixty oncology nurses, and sixty patients were surveyed. RESULTS: Improvement in symptom control was appreciated by oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients with respect to pain (Z = -4.10, P = 0.001), (Z = -5.84, P = 0.001), (Z = -6.20, P = 0.001); nausea and vomiting (Z = -3.75, P = 0.001), (Z = -5.3, P = 0.001), (Z = -5.1, P = 0.001); constipation (Z = -3.29, P = 0.001), (Z = -4.96, P = 0.001), (Z = -4.49, P = 0.001); breathlessness (Z = -3.57, P = 0.001), (Z = -5.03, P = 0.001), (Z = -4.99, P = 0.001); and restlessness (Z = -3.68, P = 0.001), (Z = -5.23, P = 0.001), (Z = -3.22, P = 0.001). Improvement in end-of-life care management was appreciated by oncologists and oncology nurses with respect to communication of prognosis (Z = -4.04, P = 0.001), (Z = -5.20, P = 0.001); discussion on limitation of life-sustaining treatment (Z = -3.68, P = 0.001), (Z = -4.53, P = 0.001); end-of-life symptom management (Z = -4.17, P = 0.001), (Z = -4.59, P = 0.001); perimortem care (Z = -3.86, P = 0.001), (Z = -4.80, P = 0.001); and bereavement support (Z = -3-80, P = 0.001), (Z = -4.95, P = 0.001). Improvement in health-related communication was appreciated by oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients with respect to communicating health related information in a sensitive manner (Z = -3.74, P = 0.001), (Z = -5.47, P = 0.001), (Z = -6.12, P = 0.001); conducting family meeting (Z = -3.12, P = 0.002), (Z = -4.60, P = 0.001), (Z = -5.90, P = 0.001); discussing goals of care (Z = -3.43, P = 0.001), (Z = -5.49, P = 0.001), (Z = -5.61, P = 0.001); maintaining hope (Z = -3.22, P = 0.001), (Z = -4.85, P = 0.001), (Z = -5.61, P = 0.001); and resolution of conflict (Z = -3.56, P = 0.001), (Z = -5.29, P = 0.001), (Z = -5.28, P = 0.001). Patients appreciated improvement in continuity of care with respect to discharge planning (Z = -6.12, P = 0.001), optimal supply of essential symptom control medications on discharge (Z = -6.32, P = 0.001), follow-up plan (Z = -6.40, P = 0.001), after hours telephonic support (Z = -6.31, P = 0.001), and preferred place of care (Z = -6.28, P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients felt that integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer improves symptom control, end-of-life care, health-related communication, and continuity of care. The perceptions of benefit of the palliative care intervention in the components surveyed, differed among the three groups.

BACKGROUND: The diagnosis and treatment of cancer poses severe psychologic distress that impacts functional quality of life. While cancer directed treatments are directed purely against tumor killing, interventions that reduce treatment related distress and improve quality of life are the need of the hour. Yoga is one such mind body intervention that is gaining popularity among cancer patients. METHOD: Several research studies in the last two decades unravel the benefits of yoga in terms of improved mood states, symptom reduction, stress reduction and improved quality of life apart from improving host factors that are known to affect survival in cancer patients. However, several metaanalysis and reviews show equivocal benefits for yoga. In this review, we will study the Yoga interventions in cancer patients with respect to expectations, benefits and risks and analyse the principles behind tailoring yoga interventions in cancer patients. RESULTS: The studies on Yoga show heterogeneity with varied types of Yoga Interventions, duration, exposure, practices and indications. It also elucidates the situational context for reaping benefits and cautions against its use in several others. However, there are several reviews and bibliometric analysis of effects of yoga; most of them have not enlarged the scope of their review to cover the basic principles behind use of these practices in cancer patients. CONCLUSION: This review offers insight into the principles and practice of yoga in cancer patients.