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The intent of the current research was to explore the impact of a specific Tibetan Buddhist meditation course containing a lab for applied practice of modern techniques upon psychological well-being in college students. We evaluated the impact of a semester-long undergraduate Tibetan Buddhist meditation course on the psychological well-being of 205 students and assessed whether changes in well-being were mediated by mindfulness. The course was composed of two weekly lectures regarding the tradition and modern applications of meditation, respectively, and a weekly lab in which the students were taught a survey of related modern contemplative techniques to practice. Students were assessed at the beginning, middle, and end of the course, and their time spent practicing the exercises were prospectively recorded. Participants reported statistically significant increases in self-reported mindfulness, self-compassion, and positive coping and significant decreases in self-reported anxiety. Mindfulness was a significant predictor of changes in self-compassion and anxiety. These results suggest that a large lecture course with weekly meditation practice can have a positive impact on the psychological well-being of students and that some of these changes are mediated by mindfulness.

The intent of the current research was to explore the impact of a specific Tibetan Buddhist meditation course containing a lab for applied practice of modern techniques upon psychological well-being in college students. We evaluated the impact of a semester-long undergraduate Tibetan Buddhist meditation course on the psychological well-being of 205 students and assessed whether changes in well-being were mediated by mindfulness. The course was composed of two weekly lectures regarding the tradition and modern applications of meditation, respectively, and a weekly lab in which the students were taught a survey of related modern contemplative techniques to practice. Students were assessed at the beginning, middle, and end of the course, and their time spent practicing the exercises were prospectively recorded. Participants reported statistically significant increases in self-reported mindfulness, self-compassion, and positive coping and significant decreases in self-reported anxiety. Mindfulness was a significant predictor of changes in self-compassion and anxiety. These results suggest that a large lecture course with weekly meditation practice can have a positive impact on the psychological well-being of students and that some of these changes are mediated by mindfulness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)

OBJECTIVE: Emergency medical service (EMS) providers are systematically subjected to intense stimuli in their work that may result in distress and emotional suffering. While it is known that mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) helps to foster well-being in healthcare workers, the effectiveness of MBSR among EMS providers is less understood. We explored the impact of a modified version of MBSR for healthcare workers called Mindfulness for Healthcare Providers (MHP) on reducing distress and promoting wellbeing in EMS providers.METHODS: A one-arm pilot study was conducted. We implemented eight two-and-a-half hour sessions of Mindfulness for Healthcare Providers with an additional day-long retreat at the end. Feasibility, perceived stress, professional quality of life, and trait mindfulness were assessed prior to and after the intervention. The professional quality of life scale includes measures of compassion satisfaction, burnout, and secondary trauma. RESULTS: Fifteen veteran EMS providers enrolled in the course; four participants dropped out. Prior to initiation of the study, no significant differences were revealed between those who did not participate (n = 48) and those who did (n = 11). After the intervention EMS providers endorsed statistically significant increases in compassion satisfaction, trait mindfulness, and decreases in burnout compared to the beginning of the program. These changes were sustained at six months post-completion. No significant changes over time were found for secondary trauma or perceived stress. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this study is the first to employ Mindfulness for Healthcare Providers in an EMS population and to demonstrate a positive impact on self-reported compassion, trait mindfulness, and burnout in this population. Additional research regarding mindfulness training within EMS populations should be conducted to further understand the relationship between mindfulness and perceived stress over time.

ObjectiveEmergency medical service (EMS) providers are systematically subjected to intense stimuli in their work that may result in distress and emotional suffering. While it is known that mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) helps to foster well-being in healthcare workers, the effectiveness of MBSR among EMS providers is less understood. We explored the impact of a modified version of MBSR for healthcare workers called Mindfulness for Healthcare Providers (MHP) on reducing distress and promoting wellbeing in EMS providers. Methods A one-arm pilot study was conducted. We implemented eight two-and-a-half hour sessions of Mindfulness for Healthcare Providers with an additional day-long retreat at the end. Feasibility, perceived stress, professional quality of life, and trait mindfulness were assessed prior to and after the intervention. The professional quality of life scale includes measures of compassion satisfaction, burnout, and secondary trauma. Results Fifteen veteran EMS providers enrolled in the course; four participants dropped out. Prior to initiation of the study, no significant differences were revealed between those who did not participate (n = 48) and those who did (n = 11). After the intervention EMS providers endorsed statistically significant increases in compassion satisfaction, trait mindfulness, and decreases in burnout compared to the beginning of the program. These changes were sustained at six months post-completion. No significant changes over time were found for secondary trauma or perceived stress. Conclusions To our knowledge, this study is the first to employ Mindfulness for Healthcare Providers in an EMS population and to demonstrate a positive impact on self-reported compassion, trait mindfulness, and burnout in this population. Additional research regarding mindfulness training within EMS populations should be conducted to further understand the relationship between mindfulness and perceived stress over time.