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Objectives: This study compares the anxiolytic effects of a yoga program and supportive therapy in breast cancer outpatients undergoing conventional treatment at a cancer centre. Methods: Ninety-eight stage 11 and III breast cancer outpatients were randomly assigned to receive yoga (n = 45) or brief supportive therapy (n = 53) prior to their primary treatment i.e., surgery. Only those subjects who received surgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy and six cycles of chemotherapy were chosen for analysis following intervention (yoga, n = 18, control, n = 20). Intervention consisted of yoga sessions tasting 60 min daily while the control group was imparted supportive therapy during their hospital visits as a part of routine care. Assessments included Speitberger's State Trait Anxiety Inventory and symptom checklist. Assessments were done at baseline, after surgery, before, during, and after radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Results: A GLM-repeated measures ANOVA showed overall decrease in both self-reported state anxiety (p < 0.001) and trait anxiety (p = 0.005) in yoga group as compared to controls. There was a positive correlation between anxiety states and traits with symptom severity and distress during conventional treatment intervals. Conclusion: The results suggest that yoga can be used for managing treatment-related symptoms and anxiety in breast cancer outpatients. (C) 2008 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Objectives: This study compares the anxiolytic effects of a yoga program and supportive therapy in breast cancer outpatients undergoing conventional treatment at a cancer centre. Methods: Ninety-eight stage 11 and III breast cancer outpatients were randomly assigned to receive yoga (n = 45) or brief supportive therapy (n = 53) prior to their primary treatment i.e., surgery. Only those subjects who received surgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy and six cycles of chemotherapy were chosen for analysis following intervention (yoga, n = 18, control, n = 20). Intervention consisted of yoga sessions tasting 60 min daily while the control group was imparted supportive therapy during their hospital visits as a part of routine care. Assessments included Speitberger's State Trait Anxiety Inventory and symptom checklist. Assessments were done at baseline, after surgery, before, during, and after radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Results: A GLM-repeated measures ANOVA showed overall decrease in both self-reported state anxiety (p < 0.001) and trait anxiety (p = 0.005) in yoga group as compared to controls. There was a positive correlation between anxiety states and traits with symptom severity and distress during conventional treatment intervals. Conclusion: The results suggest that yoga can be used for managing treatment-related symptoms and anxiety in breast cancer outpatients. (C) 2008 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

This study examined the effect of an integrated yoga programme on chemotherapy-related nausea and emesis in early operable breast cancer outpatients. Sixty-two subjects were randomly allocated to receive yoga (n = 28) or supportive therapy intervention (n = 34) during the course of their chemotherapy. Both groups had similar socio-demographic and medical characteristics. Intervention consisted of both supervised and home practice of yoga sessions lasting for 60 min daily, while the control group received supportive therapy and coping preparation during their hospital visits over a complete course of chemotherapy. The primary outcome measure was the Morrow Assessment of Nausea and Emesis (MANE) assessed after the fourth cycle of chemotherapy. Secondary outcomes included measures for anxiety, depression, quality of life, distressful symptoms and treatment-related toxicity assessed before and during the course of chemotherapy. Following yoga, there was a significant decrease in post-chemotherapy-induced nausea frequency (P = 0.01) and nausea intensity (P = 0.01), and intensity of anticipatory nausea (P = 0.01) and anticipatory vomiting (P = 0.05) as compared with the control group. There was a significant positive correlation between MANE scores and anxiety, depression and distressful symptoms. In conclusion, the results suggest a possible use for stress reduction interventions such as yoga in complementing conventional antiemetics to manage chemotherapy-related nausea and emesis.

Objectives. This study compares the effects of an integrated yoga program with brief supportive therapy in breast cancer outpatients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy at a cancer center. Methods. Eighty-eight stage II and III breast cancer outpatients are randomly assigned to receive yoga (n = 44) or brief supportive therapy (n = 44) prior to radiotherapy treatment. Assessments include diurnal salivary cortisol levels 3 days before and after radiotherapy and self-ratings of anxiety, depression, and stress collected before and after 6 weeks of radiotherapy. Results. Analysis of covariance reveals significant decreases in anxiety (P < .001), depression (P = .002), perceived stress (P < .001), 6 a.m. salivary cortisol (P = .009), and pooled mean cortisol (P = .03) in the yoga group compared with controls. There is a significant positive correlation between morning salivary cortisol level and anxiety and depression. Conclusion. Yoga might have a role in managing self-reported psychological distress and modulating circadian patterns of stress hormones in early breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy.

Objectives. This study compares the effects of an integrated yoga program with brief supportive therapy in breast cancer outpatients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy at a cancer center. Methods. Eighty-eight stage II and III breast cancer outpatients are randomly assigned to receive yoga (n = 44) or brief supportive therapy (n = 44) prior to radiotherapy treatment. Assessments include diurnal salivary cortisol levels 3 days before and after radiotherapy and self-ratings of anxiety, depression, and stress collected before and after 6 weeks of radiotherapy. Results. Analysis of covariance reveals significant decreases in anxiety (P < .001), depression (P = .002), perceived stress (P < .001), 6 a.m. salivary cortisol (P = .009), and pooled mean cortisol (P = .03) in the yoga group compared with controls. There is a significant positive correlation between morning salivary cortisol level and anxiety and depression. Conclusion. Yoga might have a role in managing self-reported psychological distress and modulating circadian patterns of stress hormones in early breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy.

Objectives. This study compares the effects of an integrated yoga program with brief supportive therapy in breast cancer outpatients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy at a cancer center. Methods. Eighty-eight stage II and III breast cancer outpatients are randomly assigned to receive yoga (n = 44) or brief supportive therapy (n = 44) prior to radiotherapy treatment. Assessments include diurnal salivary cortisol levels 3 days before and after radiotherapy and self-ratings of anxiety, depression, and stress collected before and after 6 weeks of radiotherapy. Results. Analysis of covariance reveals significant decreases in anxiety (P < .001), depression (P = .002), perceived stress (P < .001), 6 a.m. salivary cortisol (P = .009), and pooled mean cortisol (P = .03) in the yoga group compared with controls. There is a significant positive correlation between morning salivary cortisol level and anxiety and depression. Conclusion. Yoga might have a role in managing self-reported psychological distress and modulating circadian patterns of stress hormones in early breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy.

OBJECTIVES: This study compares the effects of an integrated yoga program with brief supportive therapy in breast cancer outpatients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy at a cancer centre.METHODS: Eighty-eight stage II and III breast cancer outpatients were randomly assigned to receive yoga (n = 44) or brief supportive therapy (n = 44) prior to their radiotherapy treatment. Intervention consisted of yoga sessions lasting 60 min daily while the control group was imparted supportive therapy once in 10 days. Assessments included European Organization for Research in the Treatment of Cancer-Quality of Life (EORTCQoL C30) functional scales and Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS). Assessments were done at baseline and after 6 weeks of radiotherapy treatment. RESULTS: An intention to treat GLM repeated measures ANOVA showed significant difference across groups over time for positive affect, negative affect and emotional function and social function. There was significant improvement in positive affect (ES = 0.59, p = 0.007, 95%CI 1.25 to 7.8), emotional function (ES = 0.71, p = 0.001, 95%CI 6.45 to 25.33) and cognitive function (ES = 0.48, p = 0.03, 95%CI 1.2 to 18.5), and decrease in negative affect (ES = 0.84, p<0.001, 95%CI -13.4 to -4.4) in the yoga group as compared to controls. There was a significant positive correlation between positive affect with role function, social function and global quality of life. There was a significant negative correlation between negative affect with physical function, role function, emotional function and social function. CONCLUSION: The results suggest a possible role for yoga to improve quality of life and affect in breast cancer outpatients.

CONTEXT: Breast cancer patients awaiting surgery experience heightened distress that could affect postoperative outcomes.AIMS: The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of yoga intervention on mood states, treatment-related symptoms, quality of life and immune outcomes in breast cancer patients undergoing surgery. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Ninety-eight recently diagnosed stage II and III breast cancer patients were recruited for a randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of a yoga program with supportive therapy plus exercise rehabilitation on postoperative outcomes following surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Subjects were assessed prior to surgery and four weeks thereafter. Psychometric instruments were used to assess self-reported anxiety, depression, treatment-related distress and quality of life. Blood samples were collected for enumeration of T lymphocyte subsets (CD4 %, CD8 % and natural killer (NK) cell % counts) and serum immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA and IgM). STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: We used analysis of covariance to compare interventions postoperatively. RESULTS: Sixty-nine patients contributed data to the current analysis (yoga n = 33, control n = 36). The results suggest a significant decrease in the state (P = 0.04) and trait (P = 0.004) of anxiety, depression (P = 0.01), symptom severity (P = 0.01), distress (P < 0.01) and improvement in quality of life (P = 0.01) in the yoga group as compared to the controls. There was also a significantly lesser decrease in CD 56% (P = 0.02) and lower levels of serum IgA (P = 0.001) in the yoga group as compared to controls following surgery. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest possible benefits for yoga in reducing postoperative distress and preventing immune suppression following surgery.

CONTEXT: Pre- and postoperative distress in breast cancer patients can cause complications and delay recovery from surgery.OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of yoga intervention on postoperative outcomes and wound healing in early operable breast cancer patients undergoing surgery. METHODS: Ninety-eight recently diagnosed stage II and III breast cancer patients were recruited in a randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of a yoga program with supportive therapy and exercise rehabilitation on postoperative outcomes and wound healing following surgery. Subjects were assessed at the baseline prior to surgery and four weeks later. Sociodemographic, clinical and investigative notes were ascertained in the beginning of the study. Blood samples were collected for estimation of plasma cytokines-soluble Interleukin (IL)-2 receptor (IL-2R), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interferon (IFN)-gamma. Postoperative outcomes such as the duration of hospital stay and drain retention, time of suture removal and postoperative complications were ascertained. We used independent samples t test and nonparametric Mann Whitney U tests to compare groups for postoperative outcomes and plasma cytokines. Regression analysis was done to determine predictors for postoperative outcomes. RESULTS: Sixty-nine patients contributed data to the current analysis (yoga: n = 33, control: n = 36). The results suggest a significant decrease in the duration of hospital stay (P = 0.003), days of drain retention (P = 0.001) and days for suture removal (P = 0.03) in the yoga group as compared to the controls. There was also a significant decrease in plasma TNF alpha levels following surgery in the yoga group (P < 0.001), as compared to the controls. Regression analysis on postoperative outcomes showed that the yoga intervention affected the duration of drain retention and hospital stay as well as TNF alpha levels. CONCLUSION: The results suggest possible benefits of yoga in reducing postoperative complications in breast cancer patients.